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How to Become a Dog Groomer Step-By-Step


Look, I’ll be real with you: if the idea of working with dogs on a daily basis appeals to you, then you’ll find no greater joy than pursuing a career as a dog groomer.

But that doesn’t mean it’s an easy job.

On the contrary, being a groomer can be incredibly demanding. You’ll work long hours and be on your feet for the majority of them. By the time your shifts end, your feet will probably be pretty sore (so, a nice, hot bath at the end of the day will feel like heaven for you).

There are also occupational hazards and safety risks to consider, too – both for you and the dogs.

Occupation Hazards for Dog Groomers

Some clients will be bringing in nervous, anxious, or stressed-out dogs. Especially if it’s their first time being alone with you, these types of dogs could go on the defense and feel like they need to protect themselves.

This is basically my gentle way of saying that while bites and scratches won’t be a regular part of your day, they could happen once in a blue moon. Chances are, it’ll happen at least once – or, if nothing else, an attempt by the dog will be made. So, you need to be prepared for this, both physically and emotionally.

There’s also your bodily health to keep in mind. Groomer’s lung, for example, is a very real thing. This is particularly a potential risk if your grooming career spans over a lengthy period of time, and if the proper precautions are not taken on your part.

(Don’t let this freak you out, though. It’s super easy to take the right safety measures – such as wearing a face mask and cleaning your work station regularly – and prevent groomer’s lung from ever affecting you.)

Occupational Hazards for Dogs

In a grooming environment, there’s a LOT that can go wrong if you aren’t adequately prepared. Again, this all circles back to why proper training as a groomer is so critical.

Potential hazards can range anywhere from mild, minor incidents (e.g. an accidental cut or knick while clipping them), to more extreme emergencies (e.g. accidental self-hanging on the grooming table).

Not to sound dramatic or anything, but when clients are leaving their dogs in your hands, you’re quite literally responsible for their lives for as long as they’re in your care. By getting a proper education, you’ll know how to keep them safe at all times. If an emergency happens, you’ll be equipped to handle it accordingly.

If you’re not trained, however… Well, we don’t even want to think about what could potentially happen in the event of an occupational hazard.



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